Dating love friendship itlay

and others, Kennedy-Moore outlines developmental stages in children's friendship, reflecting an increasing capacity to understand others' perspectives: "I Want It My Way", "What's In It For Me?

", "By the Rules", "Caring and Sharing", and "Friends Through Thick and Thin." In adolescence, friendships become "more giving, sharing, frank, supportive, and spontaneous." Adolescents tend to seek out peers who can provide such qualities in a reciprocal relationship, and to avoid peers whose problematic behavior suggest they may not be able to satisfy these needs.

Various academic theories of friendship have been proposed, including social exchange theory, equity theory, relational dialectics, and attachment styles.

Although there are many forms of friendship, some of which may vary from place to place, certain characteristics are present in many types of such bonds.

Adults may find it particularly difficult to maintain meaningful friendships in the workplace.

"The workplace can crackle with competition, so people learn to hide vulnerabilities and quirks from colleagues.

They gain the ability to empathize with their friends, and enjoy playing in groups.

Work friendships often take on a transactional feel; it is difficult to say where networking ends and real friendship begins." Older adults continue to report high levels of personal satisfaction in their friendships as they age, and even as the overall number of friends tends to decline.

This satisfaction is associated with an increased ability to accomplish activities of daily living, as well as a reduced decline in cognitive abilities, decreased instances of hospitalization, and better outcomes related to rehabilitation.

Based upon the reports of teachers and mothers, 75% of preschool children had at least one friend.

This figure rose to 78% through the fifth grade, as measured by co-nomination as friends, and 55% had a mutual best friend.

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